Shades of purple…

Purple is a combination of blue and red. Some say the blue represents calmness and stability while the red suggests activity and energy. 

To me, purple connotes the wealth I aspire to acquire again, the wisdom I now possess in my senior years, and the peace and security I seek to maintain, insha’allah!

It is also the color of the plants and flowers that caught my attention this afternoon…

20200508_152934

20200508_15554820200508_15535420200508_155321#flowerlover #closeuppicturesofflowers #Aeoniumarboreum #irishrose #africanlily #Osteospermumfruticosum #africandaisy #Calandrinia #Verbenarigida #tuberousvervain #anElderGent

Ramadan Improves One’s Proximity to God (SWT)…

 

aziz-acharki-kfbgt78ZsVE-unsplashPhoto by Aziz Acharki on Unsplash

The month of Ramadan (or Ramadhan) has rapidly approached this year. In Mecca, Saudi Arabia the daily duration will be about 15 hours per day, about 17 hours in Beijing, China, around 16 hours in New York City, and other parts of the U.S. and around 13 hours in Jakarta, Indonesia. Current estimates of the world Muslim population are close to 1.8 billion people. In short, quite a few people will be performing some type of Ramadan activity during this period.

My thoughts about Ramadan have been greatly inspired by Sultan Abdulhameed. I attended sessions, entitled “The Quran Discussion Group,“ in New York, which he organized. We would examine and give our personal interpretations of what particular Surahs and Ayats (chapters and verses in the Quran) mean to us. It was particularly mind-expanding. We were encouraged to share our personal insights. While not widely followed in much of Muslim society, at the time, the approach has been gathering traction. It reinforced my faith and I always departed these discussions with an improved understanding of the role I can play in making for a better world.

I first met Sultan in 2010 near the end of Ramadan, when I was trying to recover from a low point in my life. He had just authored a book, The Quran and the Life of Excellence. I later read it and am continually motivated by its contents to this day. I encourage all to obtain a copy. It will enhance your thinking…

Ramadan commemorates the time when the first verses of the Quran were revealed to Prophet Muhammad (PBUH, “peace, and blessings be upon him”) about 1400 years ago. It is considered a time to work on one’s Taqwa or self-restraint, to be consciously aware in the worship of God (SWT, “Subhanahu Wa Ta’ala,” or “Glory to Him, the Exalted”) and attain nearness to Him and in so doing, seek to become more pious.

I have always used this event as a time to refocus my energies on the discipline (or lack thereof) that has brought me this far on my journey. There have been good times as well as bad times. God (SWT) is praised for all of them (“Alhamdulillah”)! There were lessons to be taught, absorbed, and reflected on. I continue to cope and learn. I exclaim, “Allah-u-Alim!” (God (SWT) is the best teacher!)

Ramadan is the time when I especially try to work on my transformation process. Self-evaluating people learn to set goals for the future and map out a strategy for achieving them. “It is possible for everyone to move towards the life they want by making systematic changes month by month and year by year. A happy life is a balanced life and we can aim to succeed in all its aspects. Everyone’s life is different but some areas are important to most people”:

– Spiritual growth
– Happiness in personal relationships
– Quality of your health
– Financial freedom
– Professional success

Spiritual Growth

For some Muslims, prayer may be an empty ritual. The mind can get easily distracted. There may be instances where people may be speaking words that they do not fully understand. How is this supposed to help transform anyone? Clarity improves thought evolution.

While English is my native language, my prayers are in Arabic and English. It takes a little extra effort but after almost 50 some odd years of reciting, my understanding is enhanced and my gesture remains sincere.

The five disciplines in fasting, which Muslims try to work on during Ramadan, are:

– Abstaining from food during daylight hours
– Abstaining from drink during daylight hours
– Abstaining from sexual activity during daylight hours
– Waking before dawn
– Self-evaluation or reflection

Admittedly, some of these disciplines are easier to adhere to than others but think about it, none of these are really that life-threatening for most people. This is about more than simply depriving oneself of the things that may give us pleasure or fulfillment. It has been said that “the straight path leads directly to God (SWT).” This, in turn, makes it less likely that one will succumb to assorted compulsive avoidances and addictions and will increase the likelihood that one will act wisely, ethically, and humanely. We must not yield to the potential irritability, which may occur.

Fasting is a powerful method of learning to be patient in adversity. I tend to view fasting as an attempt to gain better control over one’s nafs or ego. We learn about trying to develop a softer heart and feeling compassion (empathy) for those less fortunate. I recall a gentleman I met once from Syria. His “always cheerful” demeanor particularly struck me. He said that “Ramadan is like Christmas to Muslims!” He would smile and place holiday lights in his windows during that time of the year.

Happiness in Relationships

Have you ever had everything you could hope for and still felt something was missing? This was the mental state I  was in during 2009. I thought I was a good person. I was in fairly good physical shape. I ate right. I was regularly mistaken for someone about ten years younger. I was very kind to my staff. I was generous in monetary contributions. My family life was not what I had expected it to be but I was in the process of changing it.

One day, while rising from my morning prayer (Fajr), I became dizzy and passed out. Due to other responsibilities, I waited four days before seeking medical attention. I was later diagnosed with a basal ganglia stroke! My speech was slurred, my coordination skills had deteriorated but I was lucky. I was told that the results could have been much worse had I not taken good care of my physical health. But matters did, in fact, continue to get worse. I was involved in a nasty divorce at the time. My mental health began to suffer. This jolly, happy go lucky fellow had developed severe depression! It was a time when I could see nothing good happening out of my current situation. I began to experience anxiety and could not sleep. All of my thoughts became very grim. It was as if all of the fighting spirits that had been cultivated during the decades of studying Kendo (the art of Japanese fencing) were suddenly sapped from my body. I lost all sense of hope and things did eventually get progressively more unpleasant. There were points when I actually considered suicide! I was in this state for a year before I was determined to get help.

I was later treated for a serotonin deficiency and encouraged to attend group therapy sessions for the depression. Finally, I had a scientific answer to what was affecting my moods. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter or hormone, which affects how you feel from a biochemical point of view. In its absence or lack of, you can experience loneliness and depression. Most antidepressants focus on the enhanced production of serotonin.

This was the beginning of a turning point in my life. It was at this time that I developed a greater sense of compassion for my fellow man and woman. Imagine a room full of people that were all more or less suffering from some form or type of depression. There was a New York City police officer, a Hasidic Jew, assorted people with chemical drug dependencies; adolescents with self inflicted cutting tendencies, abused housewives, and me. We all shared our stories and our plights. All of a sudden my particular problems seemed less important. I listened to the stories of these individuals and wished there was something I could do to make it easier for them but I was basically in the same boat.

I was able to survive this episode in my life based in large part based on the acknowledgment of the goodwill and support received from close friends, my children, and other family members. I began to realize the importance of my role in other people’s lives. There is a verse in the Quran, which says, “God (SWT) does not burden a soul beyond its capacity (2:286)” and a similar Biblical verse, “And God is faithful; he will not let you be tempted beyond what you can bear (1 Corinthians 10:13).” The fact that I was able to endure these things has only strengthened my belief in God (SWT) and the trials and tests He may put us through. They are all there to make us stronger.

One night while offering my prayers, I asked God (SWT) for aid in finding that special mate, someone “to love forever and always, here on Earth and in Jannah.” After a worldwide search, much patience, and perseverance, I finally came across that special person, “the other half of my Deen.” Today my mind is sharp again. My spirit soars and I am truly grateful to God (SWT) for all that has happened. Alhamdulillah! 

Quality of Health

Ramadan is the perfect time to start to get our health in order. An office assistant that once worked for me used to say that “deprivation builds character.” She was referring to her approach to child-raising but the statement holds much merit beyond its original use.

Research has shown that the mental focus achieved during Ramadan increases the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factors, which cause the body to produce more brain cells, thus improving brain function. Furthermore, a distinct reduction in the amount of the hormone cortisol, produced by the adrenal gland means that stress levels are greatly reduced both during and after Ramadan.

I can think of no better time to try and rid oneself of poor habits than Ramadan. Many of the vices like smoking and sugary foods should be avoided or restricted during this time. As you abstain from them your body will gradually acclimate itself to their absence, until your addiction is kicked for good.

The reduction of food eaten throughout the Ramadan period causes the stomach to gradually contract, meaning that you will have to consume less food before feeling full. By not eating during daylight hours you will also find that your metabolism becomes more efficient, meaning the number of nutrients absorbed for your food improves. This is because of an increase in a hormone called adiponectin, which is produced by the combination of fasting and eating late at night. It allows your muscles to absorb more nutrients. If you want to get in the habit of healthy eating, Ramadan is the perfect time to start.

I try to follow these suggestions in addition to pursuing a regular exercise routine. Ramadan is not a time to become lax or lazy!

Financial Freedom

We live in a society where money and finance play an important role in determining the conditions of people’s well-being. In many instances, it can lead to increased stress. Differences in the approach to handling finances often lead to marital discord. Following simple rules related to budgeting and investing a part of your income to help create future security can alleviate some of these problems. Establishing a plan to take advantage of investment opportunities should be a part of your strategy to build wealth. Finally, being charitably generous may also help multiply your wealth. “You can thrive by regularly giving away a portion of your income to worthwhile causes. The Quran mandates 2.5% or more.”

Once you realize how easy it is to identify the sources of routine frivolous expenditures and begin to reduce them, it will be that much easier to work towards achieving your financial goals.

Professional Success

A lot of people are unhappy with the jobs they hold. This could be due to unclear choices made earlier in life. It could have been due to jobs taken out of necessity rather than choice. In either event, if you are not happy, develop a plan to change your situation.

As circumstances may change, some professions may disappear and others may thrive. You can take action by planning to change your conditions. There are books that you can read, workshops that you can attend and there is the Internet. Only those who pro-actively plan their careers continue to do well in changing circumstances.

I am now retired but in the past,  I viewed my work as “love in action.” I had a passion for what I did (make people money, ethically). I had been blessed with having benefited from a good education and had applied the skills learned in successfully having chosen a fairly good career. Today, my thought process has evolved. The challenge is in being motivated not by external rewards so much as by self-expression and service to humanity.

We are in the time of the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic crisis. People’s lifestyles, relationships, habits, and income sources may have to change. At the time of this writing, over 50,000 people have passed in the U.S., directly related to this virus. At present, there is no cure or vaccine on the horizon. Perhaps this can serve as an opportunity to “get in touch with God (SWT).”

A Time to Recalibrate One’s GPS!

In summing up what Ramadan means to me, it is a time of self-assessment, a time to check your GPS to determine if you have strayed too far off course and still have time to correct it. Some may view it as just another ritual, but it is far more than that. It is spiritual. It is scientific. It is beneficial to your health and will help you reach your long term goals. It can provide a time in planning to improve one’s life and hopefully also move closer to God (SWT). As cited earlier: God (SWT) is the best teacher! (Allah-u-Alim!)

 

 

Sources of Inspiration

  1. Abdulhameed, Sultan. The Quran and the Life of Excellence. N.p: Outskirts, 2010. Print
  2. ‘Abd al-Haqq via Sufis Without Borders Yahoo Group
  3. “7 Surprising Health Benefits of Ramadan.”Realbuzz 4. N.p., 20 July 2012. Web.
  4. Bolt, Laurence G. Zen and the Art of Making a Living: A Practical Guide to Creative Career Design. Penguin Group, 1999. Print

Xenophobia and CYA* Strategies During the Time of Pandemic…

 

Source: SupChina article

The other morning, much like any other day, I awakened and performed my early morning prayer (Fajr). In my accompanying dua (prayer of request), as always, I asked for a better world.

Sometime after, I checked various social media accounts to see what friends and family might be doing, how they are enduring the various forms of social lockdown, or shelter-in-place. I may point to certain articles that I have read to help enlighten people or call to their attention what might be happening outside of their sphere.

I would like to call attention to events currently going on in mainland China. There are disturbing videos and accounts regarding the recent persecution of Africans in Guangzhou, China. This is related to the same xenophobia that Donald Trump used when he intentionally referred to COVID-19 as the “Chinese Virus.” Now the Chinese have gone from singling out foreigners as the cause of COVID-19 to evicting Africans from their homes.

Where is the Peace and Harmony that I experienced during my trips to China? Where is the love?

If there is a resurgence of the virus in China, it will be blamed on foreigners. In the meantime, in the U.S., leaders at the top avoid taking any blame all, choosing instead to deflect criticism by blaming ill-preparedness on the previous administration, initially denying the arrival of the pandemic or focusing all the blame on the Chinese.

These are all distractions by both parties are to “cover their asses” if things get worse! Better leadership is sorely needed on all fronts to address these matters.

In scary times, people want scapegoats. In China, now they seem to blame Africans. In the U.S., some blame the Chinese. If we could all just focus our energies on finding a cure for this dreaded virus and being good neighbors, the world would truly become a better place…

 

*Cover your ass

 https://supchina.com/2020/04/08/africans-in-guangzhou-face-special-scrutiny-amid-coronavirus-fueled-xenophobia/

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2020/03/trump-is-the-chinese-governments-most-useful-idiot/608638/

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0VqLKnXWP4

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YH1dDBKbKUg

 

https://www.factcheck.org/2020/04/trump-falsely-claims-he-inherited-empty-stockpile/

 

https://medium.com/@jurgenthoelen/belgian-dutch-study-why-in-times-of-covid-19-you-can-not-walk-run-bike-close-to-each-other-a5df19c77d08

The Statue of Liberty and What She Represents…

Statue of Liberty

I remember the time when I was in elementary school (seems like eons ago…) and we were studying the Statue of Liberty. I recall that it was near the end of the school year, sometime in early June. I guess it was a prelude to the Fourth of July. I will admit that while I have never personally visited this “great lady,” there were times when I could observe her from a short distance.
We studied the words inscribed at her base. I was personally moved by them, “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free…1 Suffice it to say that I hold what she represents in the highest regard.
It brings me great shame to see these words, seemingly disregarded in this current day and age. I know we are inherently better than this!
I would suggest that we all do a little research pertaining to the Statue of Liberty, her origin and what she represents. Please look at it in the context of today’s events.
I see the results of people trying to relieve their suffering and pursue a better life and I wonder… How will we be judged for these events? Our personal interventions bring Surah 99, Ayats 6-8 to mind,

On That Day, people shall come forth in groups to be shown their deeds.

So, whoever has done an atom’s weight of good shall behold it.

And whoever has done an atom’s weight of evil shall behold it.

When our symbol of liberty loses meaning, can America be far behind? This really worries me! I pray that this does not happen…

Migrants 1

(Recent photo of bodies of Salvadoran migrant Óscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez and his nearly 2-year-old daughter Valeria. They attempted to reach U.S. soil., Credit Julia Le Duc/Associated Press 2019)

A young migrant, who drowned in a failed attempt to sail to the Greek island of Kos, lies on the shore in the Turkish coastal town of Bodrum

(three-year-old Alan Kurdi on the shore of Turkey, 2015)

migrants 3

(Up to 70 Ethiopian migrants drowned off the Yemeni coast, 2014)

migrants 4

(Border Patrol Agent Brady Waikel rescues a 7-year-old boy from Honduras after he fell out of a makeshift raft crossing the Rio Grande River near Eagle Pass, Texas, on May 10, 2019. Bob Owen / The San Antonio Express-News via AP)

1The New Colossus

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,

With conquering limbs astride from land to land;

Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand

A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame

Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name

Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand

Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command

The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.

“Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she

With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,

Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,

The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.

Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me,

I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

Fathers…

 

On this day, I choose to remember Fathers. There is a myriad of comments and memories of Fathers, both good and bad, depending on who you ask and what time of day it is.

 

Many of us are called “Dad” or “Father” or some variation thereof. Others have the distinction of being called “Pop” or “Poppy.” I tend to be among the latter group, but this story is not necessarily about me. It is about my selective memories of him.

 

I never really knew my birth father but there was a man that in time I would choose to call Father. He inspired me, he guided me and influenced me in so many ways that I cannot recall all of them.

 

He was the first entrepreneur that I ever encountered! He had a potato chip franchise with Frito Lay and he regularly “conscripted” me to join him as he sold its products to delis, supermarkets, and bodegas throughout New York City. I learned how to greet people with a smile and a gesture of friendship. Whether it was “Que pasa, amigo” or “As salaamu aleikum” or “Shalom” these salutations all came from observations of him interacting with people in the quest to transact business and later influenced me in how I would choose to deal with people.

 

There was that extremely noteworthy spanking or “whupping” that he administered.  It deterred me from a future life of crime and directed me to pursue academic excellence at such places as Brooklyn Technical High School, Cornell University and Columbia University Graduate School of Business.

 

My introduction to the martial arts at Jerome Mackey’s Judo Inc. was largely due to his assistance. This served as the seed which would begin to cultivate my interest in Tai Chi Chuan, Kung Fu, and Kendo.

 

He gave me my first car, that 1967 red Pontiac Firebird Convertible with the rebuilt, 383 cubic inch Bonneville engine. I vividly remember cruising up to Cornell on route 79, convertible top down, listening to the Delfonics playing in my cassette deck and me trying to sing in a falsetto voice. I have yet to see a 1970s nostalgia movie portraying a scene such as this but I remain hopeful…

67 Firebird

My interest in pursuing good dietary habits stemmed for an early reading of “How to Eat to Live,” by Elijah Muhammad. My father was not Muslim but he was knowledgable regarding how to live a good life, music, classical and jazz, health and the history of slavery and how it altered our African cultural traditions. Truly, he was his own man as I continually strive to be…

 

Finally, there was the dreaded stroke which subsequently took his life. I was on a business-related ski trip to Vermont when I received a call regarding his condition. I rushed to Brooklyn, New York as fast as humanly possible in the midst of an enduring New England snowstorm.

 

There was nothing that I could do. He just laid there peacefully on life support while those of us present debated whether to disconnect the machine. He had trained me to make decisions when others may falter. In the midst of our moment of indecisiveness, he just drifted off with no help from any of us present…

 

This man will forever be remembered by me and he is forever in my prayers! He gave a song that I used to like so much more significance, Leon Thomas’ rendition of “Song for My Father.”

 

Leon Thomas: Song for My Father – Lyrics1

If there was ever a man
Who was generous, gracious and good
That was my dad
The man
A human being so true
He could live like a king
‘Cause he knew
The real pleasure in life
To be devoted to
And always stand by me
So I’d be unafraid and free
If there was ever a man
Who was generous, gracious and good
That was my dad
The man
A human being so true
He could live like a king
‘Cause he knew
The real pleasure in life
To be devoted to
And always stand by me
So I’d be unafraid and free
If there was ever a man
Who was generous, gracious and good
That was my dad
The man, The man
1http://www.allworldlyrics.com/2017/testi-canzoni/leon-thomas-song-for-my-father/

 

Solemn Thoughts on Mother’s Day

mothers II

I lost my mother at the age of 7. I remember that day clearly. My initial reaction was somewhat stoic, with no emotion. I didn’t cry until the funeral, and then only briefly.

As time proceeded, by the Grace of God, I was able to find comfort in the mothers of my closest friends and family. Reflecting on the memories, I think that perhaps they understood my loss as only another mother could.

When my dearest aunt Ella passed, I, a grown and accomplished man, could not stop the flow of tears…

Today, I am grateful for all the mothers who have ever given me something to eat, bandaged my wounds, wiped my runny nose, cleaned my ears, or given me a bosom to cry on. “Paradise is at the feet of Mothers!”

I remember you on this day and always…

“Xin Nian Kuai Le” (Happy New Year!)

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year!

I say “Happy New Year,” twice a year, once, for my family and friends in the West and once my extended family, and friends from the East.

Several years ago I wrote a note entitled “An expression of goodwill…”. It gave a brief summary of the holiday known as the Chinese New Year.

Today, I have a somewhat better perspective on the event. I gladly greet people, “Xin nian kuai le” (Happy New Year!) and “Gong xi fa cai” (Congratulations and be prosperous!) in my most perfect (?) Mandarin. Some may look at me a bit oddly, but the gesture is generally accepted with a heartfelt smile. This is my way of bringing us all a little closer…

This particular year is denoted the Year of the Pig, according to the Chinese Zodiac, symbolizing luck, overall good fortune, wealth, honesty, general prosperity, representing a hard working, a peace-loving person, a truthful, generous, indulgent, patient, reliable, trusting, sincere, giving, sociable person with a large sense of humour and understanding.

The Chinese Zodiac, aka Sheng Xiao, is based on a twelve-year cycle, with each year highlighting a different animal and its so-called characteristics. The representative signs in order are the rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, sheep, monkey, rooster, dog and pig.

One of the things I found interesting was that “one may not fare well when their sign comes up” in the cycle. I can only reflect on some of my own personal misfortunes and I am a bit of a skeptic when it comes to all of this stuff!

Those of you intrigued to explore the possible idiosyncrasies of your own “coordinates” should check out AstrologyClub.org. It covers both Chinese and Western horoscope signs.

In the meantime, I sincerely wish all of you,

Xin nian kuai le,” “Gong xi fa cai!”

A Brief Primer on Islam: Its Tenets and Major Celebrations

FT_17.01.31whereMuslimsLive

According to a recent Pew Research study (www.pewresearch.org) Muslims, with close to 1.8 billion people, account for about 25% of the world’s population and remains the fastest growing major religion. The bulk of that population resides in Asia and Southeast Asia, not the Middle East as some might suspect. With that in mind, I thought it beneficial to provide a brief summary of the key points of the Islamic belief system.
Surah Al Hujurat (43:13) states, “O mankind, indeed We have created you from male and female and made you peoples and tribes that you may know one another. Indeed, the most noble of you in the sight of Allah is the most righteous of you. Indeed, Allah is Knowing and Acquainted.”
This is my attempt at introducing some basic ideas regarding some of your neighbors. Better understanding is a constructive pursuit!
When I was a young adolescent, I would talk about the importance of information. It used to be difficult to obtain. Today, we have much better access but must be able to filter the good from the non-constructive and generally bad. I apologize in advance if I have transmitted anything false. I am fairly certain that I haven’t and assure you that it was not my intention if I have. My information is largely based on memory, traditions practiced and internet references which may offer a better and more coherent presentation.

Read! Learn! Experience and Enjoy!
The religious practice of Islam, which literally means “to submit to God”, is based on tenets that are known as the Five Pillars, arkan, to which all members of the Islamic community, Ummah, should adhere.

shahada_2

1. The Profession of Faith—The Shahada

The Profession of Faith, the shahada, is the most fundamental of Islamic beliefs. It simply states that “There is no God but God and Muhammad is his prophet.” It underscores the monotheistic nature of Islam. It is an extremely popular phrase in Arabic calligraphy and appears in numerous manuscripts and religious buildings.

2. Daily Prayers—Salat

Muslims are expected to pray five times a day. This does not mean that they need to attend a mosque to pray; rather, the salat, or the daily prayer, should be recited five times a day. Muslims can pray anywhere; however, they are meant to pray towards Mecca. The faithful pray by bowing several times while standing and then kneeling and touching the ground or prayer mat with their foreheads, as a symbol of their reverence and submission to Allah. On Friday, many Muslims attend a mosque near midday to pray and to listen to a sermon, khutbah.

3. Alms-Giving—Zakat

The giving of alms is the third pillar. Although not defined in the Qu’ran, Muslims believe that they are meant to share their wealth with those less fortunate in their community of believers.

4. Fasting during Ramadan—Saum

During the holy month of Ramadan, the ninth month in the Islamic calendar, Muslims are expected to fast from dawn to dusk. While there are exceptions made for the sick, elderly, and pregnant, all are expected to refrain from eating and drinking during daylight hours.

hajj

5. Pilgrimage to Mecca—Hajj

All Muslims who are able to are required to make the pilgrimage to Mecca and the surrounding holy sites at least once in their lives. Pilgrimage focuses on visiting the Kaaba and walking around it seven times. Pilgrimage occurs in the 12th month of the Islamic Calendar.
Source: Essay by Dr. Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis, http://www.KhanAcademy.org

Key Islamic Holidays

Islam has relatively few holidays compared to most other religions; nevertheless, sacred days and times are very important to Muslims.
When holidays are being observed, it is common for routine social activities, such as work and commerce, to stop temporarily out of respect for the person or event being remembered.
Most Islamic holidays either commemorate events in the life of the prophet Muhammad or are special days founded by him.
Traditionally, Muslims observe two major festivals (Eid Al-Fitr and Eid Al-Adha) and one month of daytime fasting (Ramadan).

What is Eid Al-Adha?

In the religion of Islam, ‘Id Al-Adha or Eid al-Adha (Arabic عيد الأضحى, “Festival of the Sacrifice”) is a major festival that takes place at the end of the Hajj. It is also known as ‘Id al-Qurban or al-‘Id al-Kabir (Major Festival). Eid al-Adha marks the completion of the hajj (pilgrimage) rites at Mina, Saudi Arabia, but is also observed by Muslims throughout the world to commemorate the faith of Ibrahim (Abraham).
Eid Al-Adha begins on the 10th of Dhu’l-Hijja, the last month of the Islamic calendar, and lasts for fours days. It begins the day after Muslims on the Hajj descend from Mount Arafat.

Dates

In the western calendar, Eid Al-Adha begins on the following days:

  • September 23-24, 2015
  • September 12-13, 2016
  • September 1-2, 2017
  • August 21, 2018
  • August 11, 2019

Meaning of the Festival

The festival commemorates Allah’s gift of a ram in place of Isma’il (Ishmael), whom God had commanded Ibrahim (Abraham) to sacrifice. (In Judaism and Christianity, the child in this story is Ishmael’s brother Isaac.)
The devil tried to persuade Ibrahim to disobey Allah and not to sacrifice his beloved son, but Ibrahim stayed absolutely obedient to Allah and drove the devil away. Eid al-Adha is a celebration of this supreme example of submission to God, which is the cornerstone of the Islamic faith (Islam means “submission”).

Eid al-Adha Observances

On Eid al-Adha, families that can afford it sacrifice an animal such as a sheep, goat, camel, or cow, and then divide the meat among themselves, the poor, friends and neighbors.
In Britain, the law requires that this is done in a slaughterhouse.
The sacrifice is called Qurban. During the sacrifice, the following prayer is recited:
In the name of Allah And Allah is the greatest O Allah, indeed this is from you and for you, O Allah accept it from me. Eid al-Adha is a public holiday in Muslim countries. Like ‘Id al-Fitr, ‘Id Al-Adha begins with communal prayer at daybreak on its first day, which takes place at the local mosque. Worshippers wear their finest clothes for the occasion. It is also a time for visiting friends and family and for exchanging gifts.

References

Id Al-Adha. Encyclopædia Britannica (Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service, 2004).
Eid ul Adha – BBC Religion & Ethics
Eid ul-Adha – Wikipedia
External Links on Eid Al-Adha –
Islamic Garden: Eid Al-Adha – Menus and recipes for Eid Al-Adha.
Islam Online: Eid Al-Adha – Guide to the holiday, with audio.
George W. Bush’s Eid Al-Adha greeting to Muslims – February 2002
Eid Al-Adha in Melbourne, Australia – ABC, March 2003
Muslim Pilgrims ‘Stone the Devil’ – CBS News, January 29, 2005
Source: www.religionfacts.com/eid-al-adha

Eid Al-Fitr breaking the fast of Ramadan

‘Id Al-Fitr or Eid al-Fitr (Arabic for “Festival of the Breaking of the Fast”) is one of Islam’s two major festivals.

Meaning

Eid al-Fitr marks the end of Ramadan, the month of fasting. It is a time of celebration and thankfulness to God for the self-control practiced during Ramadan.

Rituals

Rituals and practices of ‘Id al-Fitr are characterized by joyfulness, togetherness, and thankfulness. They include the following:

  • communal (mosque) prayer at dawn on the first day
  • social gatherings and official receptions
  • gift-giving
  • eating sweets
  • wearing new clothes
  • visiting graves of family
  • the greeting ‘Id Mubarak (“May God make it a blessed feast”). {2}

Dates of Eid al-Fitr

‘Id al-Fitr is celebrated during the first three days of the Islamic month of Shawwal, which falls on the following dates on the western calendar:

  • June 25, 2017
  • June 15, 2018
  • June 5, 2019
  • May 24, 2020

References

  1. “Islam.” Encyclopædia Britannica (Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service, 2004).
  2. Lingnet: The Global Language Network.

Source: http://www.religionfacts.com/eid-al-fitr

Ramadan

Ramadan is not a holy day to Muslims, but a holy month. It is the ninth month of the Islamic year, in which “the Quran was sent down as a guidance for the people” {1}. Ramadan is similar to the Jewish Yom Kippur in that both constitute a period of atonement; Ramadan, however, is seen less as atonement and more as an obedient response to a command from Allah. {2}
During Ramadan, those who are able must abstain from food and drink (including water), evil thoughts and deeds, and sexual intercourse from dawn until dusk for the entire month. Because the holiday cycles through the solar year, this fast can be much more challenging in some years than others. When Ramadan falls in the summer season, the days of fasting are longer and it is a greater hardship to do without water.
Non-Muslims in Islamic countries during Ramadan must be careful not to eat, drink, or smoke in the presence of Muslims during the daytime hours of fasting, as the law requires adherence to the fast in public. The traditional greeting during Ramadan is “Ramadan Mubarak” (“May God give you a blessed month”) and the reply is “Ramadan Karim” (“May God give you a generous month”). {3}
The beginning and end of Ramadan are announced when one trustworthy witness testifies before the authorities that the new moon has been sighted; a cloudy sky may, therefore, delay or prolong the fast. The end of the fast is celebrated with one of two Islamic festivals, ‘Id al-Fitr. {4}

Fasting during Ramadan

Ramadan is a time of spiritual reflection, improvement and increased devotion and worship. Muslims are expected to put more effort into following the teachings of Islam. The fast (sawm) begins at dawn and ends at sunset. In addition to abstaining from eating and drinking, Muslims also increase restraint, such as abstaining from sexual relations and generally sinful speech and behavior.
The act of fasting is said to redirect the heart away from worldly activities, its purpose being to cleanse the soul by freeing it from harmful impurities. Ramadan also teaches Muslims how to better practice self-discipline, self-control, sacrifice, and empathy for those who are less fortunate; thus encouraging actions of generosity and compulsory charity (zakat).
It becomes compulsory for Muslims to start fasting when they reach puberty, so long as they are healthy, sane and have no disabilities or illnesses. Exemptions to fasting are travel, menstruation, illness, older age, pregnancy, and breast-feeding. However, many Muslims with medical conditions insist on fasting to satisfy their spiritual needs, and healthcare professionals must work with their patients to reach common ground. Professionals should closely monitor individuals who decide to persist with fasting.
While fasting is not considered compulsory in childhood, many children endeavour to complete as many fasts as possible as practice for later life. Those who are unable to fast are obliged to make up for it. According to the Quran, those ill or traveling (musaafir) are exempt from obligation but still must make up the days missed.

Suhoor and Iftar in Ramadan

Each day before dawn, Muslims observe a pre-fast meal called suhoor. After stopping a short time before dawn, Muslims begin the first prayer of the day, the Fajr prayer. At sunset, families hasten for the fast-breaking meal known as iftar. Considering the high diversity of the global Muslim population, it is impossible to describe typical suhoor or iftar meals. Suhoor can be leftovers from the previous night’s dinner (iftar), typical breakfast foods, or ethnic foods.
In the evening, some dates are usually the first foods to break the fast; according to tradition, Muhammad broke fast with three dates. Following that, Muslims generally adjourn for the Maghrib prayer, the fourth of the five daily prayers, after which the main meal is served.
Social gatherings, many times buffet style, at iftar are frequent, and traditional dishes are often highlighted, including traditional desserts, especially those made only during Ramadan. Water is usually the beverage of choice, but juice and milk are also consumed. Soft drinks and caffeinated beverages are consumed to a lesser extent.
In the Middle East, the iftar meal consists of water, juices, dates, salads and appetizers, one or more entrees, and dessert. Typical entrees are “lamb stewed with wheat berries, lamb kebabs with grilled vegetables, or roast chicken served with chickpea-studded rice pilaf”. A rich dessert such as baklava or kunafeh (“a buttery, syrup-sweetened kadaifi noodle pastry filled with cheese”) concludes the meal. Over time, iftar has grown into banquet festivals. This is a time of fellowship with families, friends and surrounding communities, but may also occupy larger spaces at masjid or banquet halls for 100 or more diners.

Charity during Ramadan

Charity is very important in Islam, and even more so during Ramadan. Zakat, often translated as “the poor-rate”, is obligatory as one of the pillars of Islam; a fixed percentage is required to be given to the poor of the person’s savings. Sadaqa is voluntary charity in given above and beyond what is required from the obligation of Zakat.
In Islam, all good deeds are more handsomely rewarded in Ramadan than in any other month of the year. Consequently, many will choose this time to give a larger portion, if not all, of the Zakat for which they are obligated to give. In addition, many will also use this time to give a larger portion of sadaqa in order to maximize the reward that will await them on the Day of Judgment.
In many Muslim countries, it is a common sight to see people giving more food to the poor and the homeless, and even to see large public areas for the poor to come and break their fast. It is said that if a person helps a fasting person to break their fast, then they receive a reward for that fast, without diminishing the reward that the fasting person got for their fast.

Increased prayer and recitation of the Quran

In addition to fasting, Muslims are encouraged to read the entire Quran. Some Muslims perform the recitation of the entire Quran by means of special prayers, called Tarawih. These voluntary prayers are held in the mosques every night of the month, during which a whole section of the Quran (Juz’, which is 1/30 of the Quran) is recited. Therefore, the entire Quran would be completed at the end of the month. Although it is not required to read the whole Quran in the Salatul Tarawih prayers, it is common.

References

  • Qur’an 2:185.
  • “Islam.” Encyclopædia Britannica (Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service, 2004).
  • Lingnet: The Global Language Network.
  • “Islam.” Encyclopædia Britannica (Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service, 2004).
  • “Ramadan, Practices” (Wikipedia, used under GDFL)

Source: http://www.religionfacts.com/ramadan

Coping with Suicidal Inclinations

The other morning while reviewing one of my Twitter feeds, I was shocked to come across another apparent suicide. There was footage of a young man plunging to his death in the Holy city of Mecca. Earlier in the week, there were two other, noteworthy suicides. On Tuesday, June 5, 2018, Kate Spade, the renowned handbag designer and later in the week on Friday, June 8, 2018, Anthony Bourdain, noteworthy internationally traveled chef, were reported to have hung themselves. Both suffered from depression.

I recall reading a New York Times article, earlier this year about a group of Native American young men having to deal with a similar adversity.
Almost nine years ago, I made an attempt on my own life but fortunately, I was unsuccessful! It was toward the end of 2009. I was recovering from a stroke and in the midst of a nasty divorce court battle. I had just returned from a court episode, was at work and strangely began researching ways to take my life.

I could have jumped out a window. I could have stepped into oncoming traffic or in front of a train. I could have slit my wrists… These were all too messy for me to attempt.

I also thought about hanging myself. A friend had done this several years prior but I did not seek to end it, so to speak, that way!

I decided on an overdose of some pills that had been prescribed to me. Research had shown that there was a fatal quantify that could be ingested. I simply consumed the entire bottle, left a note concerning the problems I had been enduring and how there seemed to be no credible solution.

As a backup plan, I also taped a plastic bag over my head. I reclined on my bed with the intention of never waking up and drifted into sleep, hoping to never wake up ever again…

Several hours later, I awakened and reflexively ripped the plastic bag off my head. Alhamdulillah!
What was I thinking to perform such an act?

It had to have been the most selfish thing I had done in my entire life!!!

I overlooked my children, other family members and the friends who loved me. They form a major support group for me to this day.

According to the National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH), Suicide is a Leading Cause of Death in the United States.

  • Suicide was the tenth leading cause of death overall in the United States, claiming the lives of nearly 45,000 people in recent years.
  • Suicide was the second leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 10 and 34, and the fourth leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 35 and 54.
  • There were more than twice as many suicides (44,965) in the United States as there were homicides (19,362).

Suicidal tendencies tend to manifest themselves as a result of hopelessness and despair.

“Nobody loves me!”
“No one will miss my presence!”
“There is no way to get out of this situation…!”

I have overcome much in this life and hope to accomplish much more. Life is never as difficult as we imagine it to be.

There is an ayat or passage in the Quran which states roughly that “God does not burden a man beyond his capacity.” (Al-Baqarah 2:286). There is a Bible passage with a similar notion. “When the righteous cry for help, the Lord hears and delivers them out of all their troubles (Psalm 34:17)”

Today, I have faith and believe that this is really true.

We are all God’s creations. What makes us think we have the right to end our existence before our time approaches.

I recall watching a scene from the Frank Capra movie, “It’s a Wonderful Life.” You are never really aware of the consequences of your unexpected demise. It is better to “Let go and let God…” We never know what God has planned for us.

And, behold, with every hardship comes ease
verily, with every hardship comes ease! (Ash-Sharh 94:5,6)

“Being deeply loved by someone gives you strength while loving someone deeply gives you courage…”
– Lao Tzu

I have listed contacts and websites below if you or if you know of anyone having trouble coping with life’s challenges.

If You are in Crisis: PLEASE SEEK HELP!!!

If you are in crisis, call the toll-free National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (NSPL) at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The service is available to anyone. All calls are confidential.

International Suicide Prevention Hotlines
http://ibpf.org/resource/list-international-suicide-hotlines
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_suicide_crisis_lines

Selected Thoughts on Suicide
https://metro.co.uk/2018/06/09/man-leaps-death-mecca-front-thousands-worshippers-7618003/
http://www.patheos.com/blogs/christiancrier/2014/08/28/top-7-bible-verses-to-help-with-sadness-or-suicidal-thoughts/
https://spokanefavs.com/ask-a-buddhist-what-happens-to-someone-after-suicide/
https://www.islamreligion.com/articles/10370/despair-and-suicide-in-islam/
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/04/magazine/arlee-warriors-montana-basketball-flathead-indian-reservation.htmlhttps://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/04/magazine/arlee-warriors-montana-basketball-flathead-indian-reservation.html